The future is HTML5

HTML5


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With the onslaught of mobile devices and platforms from multiple vendors, the current technology underpinnings of mobility solutions are in a state of flux. With the hype surrounding the hardware and software offerings across the mobility solutions, it's a challenge for enterprises to differentiate between the offerings and also to plan for enterprise mobility strategies. Across the solutions, however, there are four distinct patterns that have emerged, which are fundamental to the underlying architecture of various mobility solutions. Each of these patterns solves a broad use case and has their own advantages and disadvantages. Understanding these patterns enables enterprises to evaluate multiple solution offerings, compare the pros and cons and also determine a mix of technologies that they can adopt for strategic mobile offerings. This article presents multiple b... (more)

HTML5: Media in a Flash...Without Flash!

Welcome to part two of the four part primer to HTML5 development. In this article, I will showcase some of the additions to the HTML5 tag library that we can leverage to make media-rich websites and web applications in the blink of an eye without Flash or other 3rd-party code. HTML5-Compatible WebBrowsers The

Google Trashes Gears

Google is dumping Gears, the widgetry used to let Google Apps work offline. The functionality has been moved to HTML 5. The company said in a blog that there will be no new Gears releases, newer browsers such as Firefox 4 and Internet Explorer 9 won't be supported with plug-ins, and Gears will be removed from Chrome in Chrome 12. In its place it's implemented support for application caches to replace Gears' offline features, replaced Gears Database API with an IndexedDB API that its "friends at Mozilla and Microsoft" - yeah, it really said that - collaborated on, substituted a File API for Gears' Blob functionality and implemented the geolocation, notifications and web worker APIs in Gears natively in Chrome. "Our mission with Gears," the post says, "was to enable more powerful web applications. Over 5 releases, we added tons of APIs, enabling everything from offli... (more)

Perhaps I Haven’t Made Myself Clear...

I've been discussing HTML5 for some time now. In July of 2010, I mentioned that I wasn't particularly concerned about PowerBuilder supporting HTML5 in the initial PowerBuilder.NET release (12.5) because: "HTML5 is largely still in its infancy, and there appears to be too much opportunity for it to fragment as previous HTML standards have done." [1] In December of 2010 I devoted an entire editorial to HTML5 [2], noting that: "I have some basic concerns that make me reluctant to recommend using HTML5 as the basis for any line of business application development in the near future." But also recommending that as far as a future version of PowerBuilder, Sybase should: "Still focus on Silverlight, still work on HTML5 as well, and give us the capability of generating applications that implement both. If the Silverlight player is available, use that, and if not then downgrad... (more)

The Past, Present and Future of Enterprise Java

The Java Platform Enterprise Edition 7 specification early draft is available for download. All these years the focus was to introduce several APIs and technologies as part of the platform to make it more powerful, simple and complete. This is the first time the focus has shifted in a completely different direction - to bring in something new to the platform, apart from the enhancements to the existing technologies. In this article, we'll look at how Java EE evolved, became a major platform specification and understand the direction in which it is moving forward. Java EE - Past A brief look at the history of the Java EE - Java Platform Enterprise Edition specification reveals that every major release of the specification has been driven by a major theme. A look at the specification details reveals that the theme for the first release of the specification J2EE 1.2 wa... (more)

Book Review: The CSS3 Anthology

The CSS3 Anthology by Rachel Andrews is subtitled instant CSS answers, how-to's, and examples. This subtitle clearly explains the goal of this book. The book consists of nine chapters. The first chapter is a quick review of CSS. The other chapters cover major topics such as text styling, image design elements, navigation, tabular data, forms and user interfaces, CSS positioning basics and CSS for layout. The topics in each chapter are laid out in the form of a question followed by one or more solutions and then a discussion explaining why that solution was offered. Here is an example of one of the questions: How do I remove the large gap between an h1 element and the following paragraph? I really like this book because it's a practical problem solver for everyday issues you encounter when designing web pages. It is especially useful for people just getting started ... (more)

Book Review | CSS3: The Missing Manual

This book is both board and deep. Meaning it covers a ton of topics and goes in-depth on all of them. This book is great for the beginner, but also has a lot of advanced material. After a nice introduction that explains the structure of the book the author starts off Part 1 covering the basics. The book starts with the basics and leads us to advanced topics by the end of the book. I have listed the 5 parts of the book below with the chapters they contain to give an idea of all the topics covered. Part 1. CSS Basics 1. HTML for CSS 2. Creating Styles and Style Sheets 3. Selectors: Identifying What to Style 4. Saving Time with Style Inheritance 5. Managing Multiple Styles: The Cascade Part 2. Applied CSS 6. Formatting Text 7. Margins, Padding, and Borders 8. Adding Graphics to Web Pages 9. Sprucing Up Your Site’s Navigation 10. CSS Transforms, Transitions, and Animations 11. Form... (more)

Social Loginwall Failure

It is not uncommon today to click an interesting link you see on Facebook only to be confronted by a "social loginwall". If you aren't familiar with that term it's probably because I just made it up to describe the use of CSS overlays to "hide" the content you want with a second overlay, usually containing a plaintive "login or register to see this content" dialog. It's annoying, particularly if it's a random site you're not sure you want to visit again and aren't comfortable openly sharing the gory details of your Facebook life with some third-party site. So what do you do? Close the tab? Swear? Sigh and move on? Not me because, well, I can read a DOM and I'm a developer by trade and Chrome has generously made sure I have access to a debugger that can modify in real-time just about any piece of a page. That "delete node" option neatly eliminates the "social loginwall... (more)

Foxconn Looking for 3,000 Engineers for Firefox OS

Foxconn wants to hire 3,000 people to support the development of new devices, including smartphones, tablets, laptops and TVs based on Mozilla's Firefox operating system. That's three times the 500-1,000 engineers it initially said it wanted to develop HTML5 and cloud applications for the open source OS. "There will be no budget limit for fostering software talent," it now says. It previously said it is "executing on a vision of eight screens, one network and one cloud" and "developing a brand new integrated approach to providing hardware, software, content, and services." Firefox OS and its apps are built entirely with HTML5, JavaScript and new Web Application APIs including emerging Device, Web App and System API standards pioneered by Mozilla. ... (more)

Personal and Enterprise Clouds, HTML5 and Mobile Devices

In the recent survey "State of Enterprise Mobility 2013" I asked the question, "How many wireless devices do you use daily?"  An incredible 69 percent use three or more wireless devices daily. I myself use three - my MacBook Pro, iPad mini and iPhone. I use my iPad mostly for reading email, notes, news, ebooks and social media, plus I watch videos and listen to music on it. I use my iPhone for the same purposes when I am on the go, plus texting, phone calls, the camera, fitness apps and maps.  I use my laptop to do many of the same things, but specifically to write, use Microsoft Office apps, participate in video conferences and conduct research and store photos. There are a lot of overlaps in what I do on the devices, which is the reason the whole concept of the "personal cloud" is so valuable to me.  Rather than store all content on devices and worry about synchro... (more)

HTML5 and the Future of PhoneGap and WebView+

By Peter Rogers, Principal Architect, Mobility, Cognizant HTML5 is still one of the most discussed topics amongst us technical types.  The key challenge, however, has remained unanswered for a long time. How do you effectively wrap HTML5 for use in native mobile applications? Unfortunately I do not have a universal answer, but I do have a solution for Android. Firstly, I recommend looking into the use of Vellamo in order to benchmark the performance of HTML5 on Android.  Vellamo is designed to be an accurate, easy to use suite of system-level benchmarks for devices based on Android 2.3 forward. Vellamo began as a mobile web benchmarking tool that today has expanded to include two primary chapters: the HTML5 chapter evaluates mobile web browser performance; and the Metal Chapter measures the CPU subsystem performance of mobile processors. I have my own custom architect... (more)