The future is HTML5

HTML5


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HTML5 introduces Application Cache, a new feature that enables you to make web apps and sites available offline. The new specification also provides an easy way to prefetch some or all of your web app's assets (HTML files, images, CSS, JavaScript, and so on) while the client is still online. During this caching process, files are stored in an application cache, where they sit ready for future offline use. Compare this to regular browser caching, in which pages that you visit are cached in the browser's cache based on server-side rules and client-side configuration. But-even if web pages are cached normally, this does not provide a reliable way for you to access pages while you're in offline mode (in an airplane, for example). In addition, an application cache can cache pages that have not been visited at all and are therefore typically unavailable in the regular br... (more)

Oops! HTML5 Does It Again

A multitude of security-related solutions rely upon the ability to extract and examine mime-objects from web-content. HTML5 may significantly impair their ability to do so. The trade off between security and performance has long been a known issue across IT organizations. One of the first things to go when performance is unacceptable is a security solution. This isn’t just an IT phenomenon either; consider how many of us have disabled endpoint security solutions like anti-virus scanners to improve performance? Our refusal to be slowed down by what may seem to some as extraneous security is what eventually led IT security professionals to revise their strategies and enforce such scans on inbound content in the network. Network-attached security scanning solutions have long been a staple of inbound e-mail and has found increasing use as a means to scan inbound web-con... (more)

Book Review | CSS3: The Missing Manual

This book is both board and deep. Meaning it covers a ton of topics and goes in-depth on all of them. This book is great for the beginner, but also has a lot of advanced material. After a nice introduction that explains the structure of the book the author starts off Part 1 covering the basics. The book starts with the basics and leads us to advanced topics by the end of the book. I have listed the 5 parts of the book below with the chapters they contain to give an idea of all the topics covered. Part 1. CSS Basics 1. HTML for CSS 2. Creating Styles and Style Sheets 3. Selectors: Identifying What to Style 4. Saving Time with Style Inheritance 5. Managing Multiple Styles: The Cascade Part 2. Applied CSS 6. Formatting Text 7. Margins, Padding, and Borders 8. Adding Graphics to Web Pages 9. Sprucing Up Your Site’s Navigation 10. CSS Transforms, Transitions, and Animations 11. Form... (more)

Book Excerpt: jQuery Essentials | Part 1

This excerpt is from the book Murach's JavaScript and jQuery by Mike Murach and Zak Ruvalcaba. Now that you have the JavaScript skills that you need for using jQuery, you're ready to learn jQuery. So, in this excerpt, you'll learn a working subset of jQuery that will get you off to a fast start. When you complete this section, you'll have all the jQuery skills that you need for developing professional web pages. You can also go on to any of the three sections that follow because they are written as independent modules. If, for example, you want to learn how to use Ajax next, skip to section 4. Get off to a fast start with jQuery In this excerpt you'll quickly see how jQuery makes JavaScript programming easier. Then, you'll learn a working subset of jQuery that will get you off to a fast start. Along the way, you'll study four complete applications that will show you ... (more)

To HTML5, or Not to HTML5, That Is the Question

If you've been following Sybase's announcements concerning their plans for future versions of PowerBuilder, you'll know that they are planning for PowerBuilder 15 to be able to generate a Silverlight application and are looking at having it generate applications based on HTML5 as well. If you've been following this column, you'll know I've been arguing that we need Silverlight generation much sooner than that. Back in November of 2008[1], I suggested that by the time PowerBuilder 12 was delivered, Microsoft would have Silverlight 3 out and it would be much more stable and ubiquitous. PowerBuilder 12 is here, and Microsoft is actually already on Silverlight 4. According to statowl.com, Silverlight was installed in 20% of browsers in November of 2008 and is now installed in 56% of browsers. Riastats.com indicates that Silverlight 4 is installed in 56% of browsers, an... (more)

IE9 Moves Out

Microsoft preened Wednesday that the newly released HTML 5-supporting Internet Explorer 9 had been downloaded 2.35 million its first 24 hours out. That's 27 downloads a second, it said, better than double the number of the IE9 beta and four times the IE9 release candidate. However, Firefox 3 did eight million and Firefox 4 is due on March 22. Chrome is the comer, but the streamlined IE9 is supposed to be faster. Both IE9 and Firefox 4 have "do not track" orders using the same technology. Microsoft also has its own Tracking Protection. Whether the preference will be respected is another matter. IE9 is only available on Windows 7 and Vista. ... (more)

HTML5 - What I Am Learning

With all the discussion around HTML5, I thought I would spend some time getting to know more about it myself. I will be researching it and sharing what I am learning through a series of articles over the next month.  I have read that it is expected to have a huge impact on mobile software applications and the business models of software vendors. Is it ready for prime time? I hear a variety of opinions on that subject. Sybase has stated that their goal is to "enable web developers to become mobile application developers" through the use of HTML5 and their mobile SDK that will come with SUP (the Sybase Unwired Platform).  I was told by Nick Brown at SAP that version 2.1 of SUP would be out in the September 2011 time frame and this version will include HTML5 support and an HTML5 container. Mobile application design and development is challenging, in part, because applica... (more)

PowerBuilder – Have Your Cake and Eat It Too

As you may be aware, the company I work for does both PowerBuilder and RIA (Flex) application development. We actually create client/server and web-based front ends for the same application. Doing that has really emphasized just how much faster we can do development using PowerBuilder. Of course, we're originally a PowerBuilder shop, so one could argue we're faster using PowerBuilder because we know it better. But along comes a thread in the Adobe Flex Developers discussion groups on Linkedin with this heading: "I'm sometimes amazed at how unproductive [modern] development tools are compared to the client/server tools of 20 years ago."[1] There's a lot of discussion back and forth, but it seems that a number of other folks chimed in with similar feelings. While the development environment has changed (mobile devices and the web), many of the tasks that are simple t... (more)

More Mobile HTML5 Apps for Your Review

This week we have found more mobile HTML5 applications for your review.  If you are like me, you want to see what others have done with HTML5 so you can start understanding how you can utilize HTML5 apps in your own enterprise. Touch Salesforce Salesforce has just announced a new application based on open standard HTML5 technology. The app will be available in 2012 and will run on most popular mobile devices. Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff says “The change in hardware is also being complemented by a huge change in software – and that software is HTML5. This software will give us the ability to build applications that run natively on mobile devices, but are also managed as a service…” http://www.salesforce.com/touch/ LinkedIn Mobile A new HTML5-based mobile website has been developed for Android and iPhone users by business social network LinkedIn. Users may access LinkedIn v... (more)

Patterns of Enterprise Mobility

With the onslaught of mobile devices and platforms from multiple vendors, the current technology underpinnings of mobility solutions are in a state of flux. With the hype surrounding the hardware and software offerings across the mobility solutions, it's a challenge for enterprises to differentiate between the offerings and also to plan for enterprise mobility strategies. Across the solutions, however, there are four distinct patterns that have emerged, which are fundamental to the underlying architecture of various mobility solutions. Each of these patterns solves a broad use case and has their own advantages and disadvantages. Understanding these patterns enables enterprises to evaluate multiple solution offerings, compare the pros and cons and also determine a mix of technologies that they can adopt for strategic mobile offerings. This article presents multiple b... (more)

Book Excerpt: Introducing HTML5

HTML5 is a draft specification for the next major iteration of HTML. It represents a break from its predecessors, HTML4 and XHTML. Some elements have been removed and it is no longer based on SGML, an older standard for document markup. HTML5 also has more allowances for incorrect syntax than were present in HTML4. It has rules for parsing to allow different browsers to display the same incorrectly formatted document in the same fashion. There are many notable additions to HTML, such as native drawing support and audiovisual elements. In this chapter, we discuss the features added by HTML5 and the associated JavaScript APIs. Beyond Basic HTML HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), invented by Tim Berners-Lee, has come a long way since its inception in 1990. Figure 1-1 shows an abbreviated timeline of HTML from the HTML5Rocks slides (http://slides.html5rocks.com/#slide3)... (more)