The future is HTML5

HTML5


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HTML5 is a draft specification for the next major iteration of HTML. It represents a break from its predecessors, HTML4 and XHTML. Some elements have been removed and it is no longer based on SGML, an older standard for document markup. HTML5 also has more allowances for incorrect syntax than were present in HTML4. It has rules for parsing to allow different browsers to display the same incorrectly formatted document in the same fashion. There are many notable additions to HTML, such as native drawing support and audiovisual elements. In this chapter, we discuss the features added by HTML5 and the associated JavaScript APIs. Beyond Basic HTML HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), invented by Tim Berners-Lee, has come a long way since its inception in 1990. Figure 1-1 shows an abbreviated timeline of HTML from the HTML5Rocks slides (http://slides.html5rocks.com/#slide3)... (more)

Using HTML5 Application Cache to Create Offline Web Applications

HTML5 introduces Application Cache, a new feature that enables you to make web apps and sites available offline. The new specification also provides an easy way to prefetch some or all of your web app's assets (HTML files, images, CSS, JavaScript, and so on) while the client is still online. During this caching process, files are stored in an application cache, where they sit ready for future offline use. Compare this to regular browser caching, in which pages that you visit are cached in the browser's cache based on server-side rules and client-side configuration. But-even if web pages are cached normally, this does not provide a reliable way for you to access pages while you're in offline mode (in an airplane, for example). In addition, an application cache can cache pages that have not been visited at all and are therefore typically unavailable in the regular br... (more)

Perhaps I Haven’t Made Myself Clear...

I've been discussing HTML5 for some time now. In July of 2010, I mentioned that I wasn't particularly concerned about PowerBuilder supporting HTML5 in the initial PowerBuilder.NET release (12.5) because: "HTML5 is largely still in its infancy, and there appears to be too much opportunity for it to fragment as previous HTML standards have done." [1] In December of 2010 I devoted an entire editorial to HTML5 [2], noting that: "I have some basic concerns that make me reluctant to recommend using HTML5 as the basis for any line of business application development in the near future." But also recommending that as far as a future version of PowerBuilder, Sybase should: "Still focus on Silverlight, still work on HTML5 as well, and give us the capability of generating applications that implement both. If the Silverlight player is available, use that, and if not then downgrad... (more)

Book Excerpt: jQuery Essentials | Part 1

This excerpt is from the book Murach's JavaScript and jQuery by Mike Murach and Zak Ruvalcaba. Now that you have the JavaScript skills that you need for using jQuery, you're ready to learn jQuery. So, in this excerpt, you'll learn a working subset of jQuery that will get you off to a fast start. When you complete this section, you'll have all the jQuery skills that you need for developing professional web pages. You can also go on to any of the three sections that follow because they are written as independent modules. If, for example, you want to learn how to use Ajax next, skip to section 4. Get off to a fast start with jQuery In this excerpt you'll quickly see how jQuery makes JavaScript programming easier. Then, you'll learn a working subset of jQuery that will get you off to a fast start. Along the way, you'll study four complete applications that will show you ... (more)

HTML5: Media in a Flash...Without Flash!

Welcome to part two of the four part primer to HTML5 development. In this article, I will showcase some of the additions to the HTML5 tag library that we can leverage to make media-rich websites and web applications in the blink of an eye without Flash or other 3rd-party code. HTML5-Compatible WebBrowsers The

SPDY versus HTML5 WebSockets

A recent post on the HTTP 2.0 War beginning garnered a very relevant question regarding WebSockets and where it fits in (what might shape up to be) an epic battle. The answer to the question, “Why not consider WebSockets here?” could be easily answered with two words: HTTP headers. It could also be answered with two other words: infrastructure impact. But I’m guessing Nagesh (and others) would like a bit more detail on that, so here comes the (computer) science. Different Solutions Have Different Impacts Due to a simple (and yet profound) difference between the two implementations, WebSockets is less likely to make an impact on the web (and yet more likely to make an impact inside data centers, but more on that another time). Nagesh is correct in that in almost all the important aspects, WebSockets and SPDY are identical (if not in implementation, in effect). Both ... (more)

Mozilla Chief to Quit

Mozilla CEO Gary Kovacs will be stepping down sometime later this year he told employees Thursday. Mozilla will be looking for a new chief executive and Kovacs will stay there until that person is found. He wants "something more commercial" to entertain him and will stay on the board. Under his watch Mozilla, oddly both a for-profit and non-profit, which is like serving the biblical two masters, went mobile and created the open HTML5-based - none of this fragmented native to a particular operating system business - Firefox OS, which has been adopted by some carriers in emerging markets like Brazil's Telefónica for their entry-level phones. Its carrier partners include Deutsche Telekom, Smart, Sprint, Telecom Italia, Telenor and Etisalat. All Things D says Kovacs also struck a commercial software deal with Samsung to "build a new browser engine for Android and the ... (more)

Kaazing WebSocket Gateway Security is Strong

This is the second post of a two-part blog post that discusses HTML5 WebSocket and security. The first post, HTML5 WebSocket Security is Strong, talked about the security benefits that derive from being HTTP-compatible and the WebSocket standard itself. In this, the second post, I will highlight some of the extra security capabilities that Kaazing WebSocket Gateway offers. Kaazing WebSocket Gateway makes your Web application architecture more secure. We leverage the HTTP and WebSocket standards as well as Kaazing-specific technology for capabilities beyond what the standard provides, but what real-world applications typically need. What are some of those things? Read on… HTTP Authentication (Challenge/Response) Specified by RFC 2617, a WebSocket gateway/server can issue a standard HTTP challenge and receive a token or other authentication information in the HTTP ... (more)

The Past, Present and Future of Enterprise Java

The Java Platform Enterprise Edition 7 specification early draft is available for download. All these years the focus was to introduce several APIs and technologies as part of the platform to make it more powerful, simple and complete. This is the first time the focus has shifted in a completely different direction - to bring in something new to the platform, apart from the enhancements to the existing technologies. In this article, we'll look at how Java EE evolved, became a major platform specification and understand the direction in which it is moving forward. Java EE - Past A brief look at the history of the Java EE - Java Platform Enterprise Edition specification reveals that every major release of the specification has been driven by a major theme. A look at the specification details reveals that the theme for the first release of the specification J2EE 1.2 wa... (more)

To HTML5, or Not to HTML5, That Is the Question

If you've been following Sybase's announcements concerning their plans for future versions of PowerBuilder, you'll know that they are planning for PowerBuilder 15 to be able to generate a Silverlight application and are looking at having it generate applications based on HTML5 as well. If you've been following this column, you'll know I've been arguing that we need Silverlight generation much sooner than that. Back in November of 2008[1], I suggested that by the time PowerBuilder 12 was delivered, Microsoft would have Silverlight 3 out and it would be much more stable and ubiquitous. PowerBuilder 12 is here, and Microsoft is actually already on Silverlight 4. According to statowl.com, Silverlight was installed in 20% of browsers in November of 2008 and is now installed in 56% of browsers. Riastats.com indicates that Silverlight 4 is installed in 56% of browsers, an... (more)

Cross-Platform Mobile Website Development – a Tool Comparison

Gartner says, in three years, mobile application development projects will outnumber PC projects by 4-1 ratio and in four years, 50% of the people will primarily access their emails from a mobile device. So, the necessity of establishing a mobile channel for your customer is – well a no-brainer. However, should you just build a mobile website or should you also invest in building native applications is not easy to decide. There can be no doubt that you need to have a website optimized for mobile devices. What is the best way to build and maintain that website is not a simple decision. There are many tools of different types available in the market but it's not strictly necessary to use any of them as each mobile platform comes with its own toolset. The cross-platform tolls can broadly be classified into five categories. They are: (1) Mobile Web (JavaScript-CSS libr... (more)