The future is HTML5

HTML5


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HTML5 will certainly have an impact on web applications, but not nearly as much as hoped on the mobile application market There’s a war on the horizon. But despite appearances, it’s a war for interactive web application dominance, and not one that’s likely to impact very heavily the war between mobile and web applications. First we have a report by ABI Research indicating a surge in the support of HTML5 on mobile devices indicating substantially impressive growth over the next five years. More than 2.1 billion mobile devices will have HTML5 browsers by 2016, up from just 109 million in 2010, according to a new report by ABI Research. -- The HTML Boom is Coming. Fast. (June 22, 2011) Impressive, no? But browser support does not mean use, and a report issued the day before by yet another analytics firm indicates that HTML5 usage on mobile applications is actually dec... (more)

Book Review: The CSS3 Anthology

The CSS3 Anthology by Rachel Andrews is subtitled instant CSS answers, how-to's, and examples. This subtitle clearly explains the goal of this book. The book consists of nine chapters. The first chapter is a quick review of CSS. The other chapters cover major topics such as text styling, image design elements, navigation, tabular data, forms and user interfaces, CSS positioning basics and CSS for layout. The topics in each chapter are laid out in the form of a question followed by one or more solutions and then a discussion explaining why that solution was offered. Here is an example of one of the questions: How do I remove the large gap between an h1 element and the following paragraph? I really like this book because it's a practical problem solver for everyday issues you encounter when designing web pages. It is especially useful for people just getting started ... (more)

Book Review | CSS3: The Missing Manual

This book is both board and deep. Meaning it covers a ton of topics and goes in-depth on all of them. This book is great for the beginner, but also has a lot of advanced material. After a nice introduction that explains the structure of the book the author starts off Part 1 covering the basics. The book starts with the basics and leads us to advanced topics by the end of the book. I have listed the 5 parts of the book below with the chapters they contain to give an idea of all the topics covered. Part 1. CSS Basics 1. HTML for CSS 2. Creating Styles and Style Sheets 3. Selectors: Identifying What to Style 4. Saving Time with Style Inheritance 5. Managing Multiple Styles: The Cascade Part 2. Applied CSS 6. Formatting Text 7. Margins, Padding, and Borders 8. Adding Graphics to Web Pages 9. Sprucing Up Your Site’s Navigation 10. CSS Transforms, Transitions, and Animations 11. Form... (more)

Book Excerpt: jQuery Essentials | Part 1

This excerpt is from the book Murach's JavaScript and jQuery by Mike Murach and Zak Ruvalcaba. Now that you have the JavaScript skills that you need for using jQuery, you're ready to learn jQuery. So, in this excerpt, you'll learn a working subset of jQuery that will get you off to a fast start. When you complete this section, you'll have all the jQuery skills that you need for developing professional web pages. You can also go on to any of the three sections that follow because they are written as independent modules. If, for example, you want to learn how to use Ajax next, skip to section 4. Get off to a fast start with jQuery In this excerpt you'll quickly see how jQuery makes JavaScript programming easier. Then, you'll learn a working subset of jQuery that will get you off to a fast start. Along the way, you'll study four complete applications that will show you ... (more)

HTML5: Media in a Flash...Without Flash!

Welcome to part two of the four part primer to HTML5 development. In this article, I will showcase some of the additions to the HTML5 tag library that we can leverage to make media-rich websites and web applications in the blink of an eye without Flash or other 3rd-party code. HTML5-Compatible WebBrowsers The

Using HTML5 Application Cache to Create Offline Web Applications

HTML5 introduces Application Cache, a new feature that enables you to make web apps and sites available offline. The new specification also provides an easy way to prefetch some or all of your web app's assets (HTML files, images, CSS, JavaScript, and so on) while the client is still online. During this caching process, files are stored in an application cache, where they sit ready for future offline use. Compare this to regular browser caching, in which pages that you visit are cached in the browser's cache based on server-side rules and client-side configuration. But-even if web pages are cached normally, this does not provide a reliable way for you to access pages while you're in offline mode (in an airplane, for example). In addition, an application cache can cache pages that have not been visited at all and are therefore typically unavailable in the regular br... (more)

HTML5 - What I Am Learning

With all the discussion around HTML5, I thought I would spend some time getting to know more about it myself. I will be researching it and sharing what I am learning through a series of articles over the next month.  I have read that it is expected to have a huge impact on mobile software applications and the business models of software vendors. Is it ready for prime time? I hear a variety of opinions on that subject. Sybase has stated that their goal is to "enable web developers to become mobile application developers" through the use of HTML5 and their mobile SDK that will come with SUP (the Sybase Unwired Platform).  I was told by Nick Brown at SAP that version 2.1 of SUP would be out in the September 2011 time frame and this version will include HTML5 support and an HTML5 container. Mobile application design and development is challenging, in part, because applica... (more)

More Mobile HTML5 Apps for Your Review

This week we have found more mobile HTML5 applications for your review.  If you are like me, you want to see what others have done with HTML5 so you can start understanding how you can utilize HTML5 apps in your own enterprise. Touch Salesforce Salesforce has just announced a new application based on open standard HTML5 technology. The app will be available in 2012 and will run on most popular mobile devices. Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff says “The change in hardware is also being complemented by a huge change in software – and that software is HTML5. This software will give us the ability to build applications that run natively on mobile devices, but are also managed as a service…” http://www.salesforce.com/touch/ LinkedIn Mobile A new HTML5-based mobile website has been developed for Android and iPhone users by business social network LinkedIn. Users may access LinkedIn v... (more)

Patterns of Enterprise Mobility

With the onslaught of mobile devices and platforms from multiple vendors, the current technology underpinnings of mobility solutions are in a state of flux. With the hype surrounding the hardware and software offerings across the mobility solutions, it's a challenge for enterprises to differentiate between the offerings and also to plan for enterprise mobility strategies. Across the solutions, however, there are four distinct patterns that have emerged, which are fundamental to the underlying architecture of various mobility solutions. Each of these patterns solves a broad use case and has their own advantages and disadvantages. Understanding these patterns enables enterprises to evaluate multiple solution offerings, compare the pros and cons and also determine a mix of technologies that they can adopt for strategic mobile offerings. This article presents multiple b... (more)

Salesforce Trots Out Desk.com

Cloud doyen Salesforce.com Tuesday fielded Desk.com, a new on-demand social and mobile help desk platform that's supposed to let businesses deliver personal customer service by unifying support channels including Twitter, Facebook, e-mail, the phone and the web via a Desk.com Agent Desktop. Basic pricing starts at $49 a month per full-time agent for unlimited usage. Flex pricing runs $1 an hour per part-time agent. Users can reportedly respond to cases themselves on the go, re-assign, change groups, change status, change priority for cases and modify customer information associated with cases. The widgetry is supposed to be utterly simple. Reporting, available later this quarter, will include data on how many cases customer service agents have opened, resolved, replied to, reassigned, or reopened regardless of who was assigned the case. It will be priced when it go... (more)

Book Review: The Definitive Guide to HTML5

Although I started with Cold Fusion for application development, I did plenty brochureware sites with HTML. I believe the version was HTML 2.0 for IE 2.0. I lived in the browser world for years doing Cold Fusion, ASP, and HTML sites. When winforms and Smart Client with Web Services emerged I changed my religion. I have been avoiding the browser whenever possible since. For the past couple of years my extent of using simple HTML has been limited to writing blogs and book reviews. Simple HTML means no ASP.NET or ASP.NET MVC. With all the HTML5 hype I figured I would take some time and read a few books on it. This one is my third and I have one more on the way. So far I have found HTML5 is no different than any other version with respect to the way its capabilities are implemented and where it belongs when architecting a solution. It is far reaching, but if you want a rich... (more)